Category: Russian

Russian Beets, Carrot and Cheese Salad – Mistress

Salad Mistress – Lubovnitsa. There is three popular Russian (Soviet) salads in one – beets and nuts, carrot and raisins, cheese and garlic. In my opinion, once it was not enough space for all dishes on table and someone folded three salads in one. It turned out quite well. It’s still mayonnaise owned cuisine, but come on, don’t you love coleslaw? It’s crunchy and creamy with some heat and sweet. Good for BBQ party.

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Russian Thin Pancakes with Mashed Potato – Blinchiki

It’s Maslenitsa week in Russia – blini and blinchiki, butter and cheese and all winter fun. Every year I’m looking for new recipes and every year find something special. Like these thin pancakes or blinchiki with mashed potato. They are easy to make (with some knowledge of blinchiki or crepes).

Russian Thin Pancakes with Mashed Potato

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Russian Tuna Salad – Salat Mimosa

If you ask Russians about “mimosa”, in most cases they will tell you it’s ether flower tree or a salad, not a drink. There are some variations of recipe, but  this is classic mayonnaise salad, like Olivier and Herring under Coat (Shuba). In my times it was salad for International Workers’ Day on May 1 (also known as Labour Day).

I don’t know who came up with the recipe. It appeared in the 70s of the last century. Easy to find ingredients – a canned fish in oil or own juice, onions, relatively hard cheese and boiled eggs – could be found in most houses in the spring. Some shredded butter can be added on onion layer, but it’s not practiced in my family.

Later someone add most important ingredient in all modern Russian salads – boiled potato (for fullness) and boiled carrot (for pretty orange color). But I prefer easy and lighter recipe.

Russian Mimosa Salad is made in layers, but if you just mix all together you find great tuna salad for sandwiches and wraps.

Russian Tuna Salad - Salat Mimosa

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Russian Cabbage Soup – Lazy or Rahmannie Shchi

In fact, the word "rahman" means "lazy, rustic" (in Old Russian). In the end of 19 century, shchi, cooked hastily from non-acidic green components, call “rahmannie shchi”. Recipe inspired by William V. Pokhlebkin book “Cuisines of our nations”.

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Russian Yeast Apple Fritters – Yablochnie Oladushki

Fall Sundays we use for agro tourism – picking up fruits and veggies from local farms. Now we  can try lots of different sorts of apples. This is one of great uses for sweet ones.

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